A Brief Look at Happiness Across Non-Western Cultures

Dhwani presents a special talk by Helaine Selin, formerly of Hampshire College, Massachusetts, USA, on Saturday the 25th of March, at 5:00 pm, at AMRL Conference Hall.

From Ms. Selin’s Wikipedia page:

Helaine Selin is well known for being the editor of Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures (1997) which is one of the first books which allows readers to “compare a variety of traditional systems of mathematics and cosmologies.” Mathematics Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Mathematics (2000), is considered by Mathematical Intelligencer as a companion to the Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures. The journal, Mathematics and Computer Education, wrote that Mathematics Across Cultures filled a gap in the history of mathematics and was “an exciting collection of papers on ethnomathematics.” Selin’s editorial work, Nature Across Cultures: Views of Nature and the Environment in Non-Western Cultures (2003), was considered by Polylog to be a “valuable source for intercultural philosophers.” Selin edited the Encyclopaedia of Classical Indian Sciences (2007), which she said she worked on for six years.

The Encyclopaedia of Classical Indian Sciences was co-edited by Ms. Selin and JNC’s own Prof. Roddam Narasimha. An abstract from the speaker follows.

Abstract:
The talk is mainly taken from a book I edited called Happiness Across Cultures.
It concerns (1) the relation of happiness to culture; (2) whether there is a
difference between happiness, contentment, quality of life, well-being, etc.; (3)
the connection between equality and happiness; (4) what the role of comparison
is; (5) if there is a connection between gender and happiness; and (6)
adaptation: how does people’s ability to adapt help them be happy? I shall focus
a bit on India, but as India is so different from the rest of the world, it shall only
be a bit. The talk is not meant to be a guide to being happy, but an academic
discussion of how the people in the non-Western world view happiness.

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